Kakahaia Beach Park – A Brid-Lover’s Haven in Molokai, Hawaii

Kakahaia Beach Park - Molokai, HawaiiKakahaia Beach Park is a 42-acre county park and bird sanctuary located on the south coast of the island of Molokai in Hawaii. While swimming and other water activities are not excellent due to the rocky and shallow ocean bottom, the park provides a great spot for birdwatching and picnicking. The beach is also popular for fishing.

The name Kakahai’a was derived from the Hawaiian word which means “fish slicing”. During the ancient times, the beach was a Hawaiian fishpond used to raise fish for the royalty. The pond is now overgrown with bullrushes and is no longer used. Read more

Cove Park – Great Spot to Learn Surfing in Maui

Cove Park - Maui, HawaiiCove Park is a small beach park located in Kihei, on the southern shore of Maui. It has a sandy beach with some rocky areas. With a tiny grassy area, picnic tables and some shady trees, the park is a popular hang out among locals.

The north end of the beach is also a popular spot to learn surfing. In fact many surfing schools use the beach to train beginner surfers because it seems to have the perfect geographical conditions for waves that are ideal for surfing. The area is quite shallow and as a result, the waves form far out and remain ridable until almost the shore. Read more

Koloa History Center – A Glimpse Into Kauai’s First Sugar Plantation

Koloa History Center - Kauai, HawaiiThe Koloa History Center is a museum showcasing photos and artifacts about the town of  Koloa during the plantaton era and it’s distinction as Hawaii’s first successful sugar mill. The museum is housed in one of the historic buildings (Building 10) in the Old Koloa Town in Poipu, on the south shore of Kauai.

Actually, the entire town serves as an outdoor museum where many of its old buildings where preserved and have plaques describing their history, as well as the businesses and families who lived, worked, and played there. Today, the buildings house unique shops, art galleries and dining establishments. Read more

Kiowea Beach Park – Spectacular Sunsets in Molokai, Hawaii

Kiowea Beach Park - Molokai, HawaiiKiowea Beach Park is a narrow beach located on Molokai’s southern coast. It lies between the towns of Kaunakakai and Kalamalua, near the popular Kapuaiwa Coconut Grove. The historic grove is named in honor of the high chief Kapuaiwa, who in 1863 became King Kamehameha V. It is said that the Hawaiian monarch himself planted some of the coconuts in this site.

Unfortunately, this beach park leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to swimming and other water activities. The ocean bottom is rocky and can be very murky because of silt. Nevertheless, it’s a great spot for a barbeques and picnics with excellent views of the Kapuaiwa Coconut Grove. Sunsets in this beach are also breathtaking. This park is worth a visit if only to marvel at the leaning coconuts trees juxtaposed against the setting sun. Read more

Kaneaki Heiau – A Glimpse to Hawaiian Ancient Culture and Natural Beauty

Kaneaki Heiau - Oahu, HawaiiKaneaki Heiau is a well-preserved ancient Hawaiian temple located in Makaha Valley in Oahu, Hawaii. It was believed to have been built in the 17th century and dedicated to Lono, one of the most revered Hawaiian gods associated with fertility, agriculture, rainfall, and music. It was eventually rededicated by King Kamehameha I as a war temple.

The historic sacred site, including its grass and thatched huts formerly used as prayer and meditation chambers, has been completely restored by the Bishop Museum to be historically correct. Nestled in lush tropical vegetation with spectacular views of Oahu’s west Waianae Coast, the site serves as an excellent spot to explore Hawaii’s ancient culture and natural beauty. Read more